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Cathedral of Christ the Saviour Card Model Kit

Card Model Kit Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Type: cathedral
Series: architecture
Country: the Russia
Scale: 1:400
Volume: 11 sheets A4 (8,3” x 11,7”)

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Categories: Orel - publishing house Architecture & Buildings

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Overview

Card Model Kit Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Type: cathedral
Series: architecture
Country: the Russia
Scale: 1:400
Volume: 11 sheets A4 (8,3” x 11,7”)

Card Model Kit Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Instruction: in English, German, Polish, and Russian (detailed illustrations are included)
For building you may need: scissors, glue for paper, sharp knife (or scalpel), awl, ruler, toothpicks or matches, cardboard (about 1 mm thick)

Even if you are the beginner in modeling, don’t be afraid to start with this model kit.
Instructions and illustrations, high quality printing and excellent coloring, perfectly selected details scale will make the process of building pleasant and amazing; at the end you will have a wonderful stunning model made by your own hands.

Prototype
The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour (Russian: Храм Христа Спасителя) or Khram Khrista Spasitelya is a Church in Moscow, Russia, on the bank of the Moskva River, a few blocks west of the Kremlin. It is the tallest Eastern Orthodox Church.
When Napoleon retreated from Moscow, Tsar Alexander I signed a manifest, 25 December 1812, declaring his intention to build a Cathedral in honor of Christ the Saviour "to signify Our gratitude to Divine Providence for saving Russia from the doom that overshadowed Her" and as a memorial to the sacrifices of the Russian people.
The Cathedral took many years to build and did not emerge from its scaffolding until 1860. Some of the best Russian painters (Ivan Kramskoi, Vasily Surikov, Vasily Vereshchagin) continued to embellish the interior for another twenty years. The Cathedral was consecrated on the very day Alexander III was crowned, 26 May 1883. A year earlier, Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture debuted there.
After the Revolution and, more specifically, the death of Lenin, the prominent site of the cathedral was chosen by the Soviets as the site for a monument to socialism known as the Palace of the Soviets. This monument was to rise in modernistic, buttressed tiers to support a gigantic statue of Lenin perched on top of a dome with his arm raised in the air.
On 5 December 1931, by order of Stalin's minister Kaganovich, the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour was dynamited and reduced to rubble. It took more than a year to clear the debris from the site. For a long time, they were the only reminder of the largest Orthodox Church ever built.
The construction of the Palace of Soviets was interrupted owing to a lack of funds, problems with flooding from the nearby Moskva River, and the outbreak of war. The flooded foundation hole remained on the site until, under Nikita Khrushchev, it was transformed into the world's largest open air swimming pool, and it was called the Moskva Pool.
In February 1990, the Russian Orthodox Church received permission from the Soviet Government to rebuild the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour. A temporary cornerstone was laid by the end of the year. The restorer Aleksey Denisov was called upon to design a replica of extraordinary accuracy.
A construction fund was initiated in 1992 and funds began to pour in from ordinary citizens in the autumn of 1994. In this year the pool was demolished and the cathedral reconstruction commenced. About one million Muscovites donated money for the project. There are still arguments about the reconstruction. First the project was supervised by architect Aleksey Denisov. Soon he was fired from the project because of disagreements with the Mayor’s office.
When construction was well under way, Denisov was replaced by Zurab Tsereteli, who introduced several controversial innovations. For instance, the original marble high reliefs along the walls gave way to the modern bronze ones, which have few, if any, parallels in Russian church architecture. The lower church was consecrated to the Saviour's Transfiguration in 1996, and the completed Cathedral of Christ the Saviour was consecrated on the Transfiguration day, 19 August 2000.

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